Law and disorder

Law and disorder

182 CURRENTPUBLICATION ABSTRACTS other information systems, and the security requirements for criminal information. The different languages necessa...

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182

CURRENTPUBLICATION

ABSTRACTS

other information systems, and the security requirements for criminal information. The different languages necessary for communication between the various components of the system are discussed as are the functions the system should ideally perform. A theoretical modular system is presented and discussed in detail. Intra- and inter-system communications, documentation of information, the conversion of records to conform to the system, and human considerations inherent to such a system are also covered in separate chapters. The book has numerous diagrams to facilitate presentation of the material, and, included as an appendix, there is a sample ‘Request for Proposal’ that demonstrates how to present requirements of a proposed system so that contractors’ bids may be solicited. Law and Disorder compiled by Samuel I. Shuman. Wayne State University Press (Detroit, Michigan 4&X202), 1971, 236 pp., hardcover - $8.95. Law and Disorder is a collection of essays subtitled “The Legitimation of Direct Action as an Instrument of Social Policy” compiled from the Leo M. Franklin Memorial Lectures at Wayne State University. It focuses on problems created by the use of violent protest. Historical antecedents are discussed by former Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark. Direct action as an interpretation of free speech is one topic of the author who also discusses the effects of direct action on campus. Ernest van der Haag treats on the definition, justification and some explanations of this phenomenon. Direct action, racial protest and public policy are the topics of the section by Charles V. Hamilton. An appendix showing the results of a study on student views and expectations of authority is included. Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement:

Cases by Paul B. Weston.

Prentice-Hall (Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey 07632), 1972, 185 pp., paperback - $5.95. This work presents cases to promote discussion in introductory classes in criminal justice. Two to three cases are provided for each of the nine topic areas. These areas are: community control of police behavior, judicial review and police standards, eyewitness identification, brformants and undercover agents, dishonesty and corruption, guilt and innocence, free press in relation to a free trial, the offender and the victim, and juvenile justice. Each topic is presented in a separate chapter with an introduction and summary. Each case is presented in narrative or dialogue form and is followed by a list of questions to help focus attention on the issues.