A comparison of memory and intellectual decline in schizophrenia and healthy controls

A comparison of memory and intellectual decline in schizophrenia and healthy controls

210 and National Adult Reading Test (NART). Both NSFM and SFM subjects showed impaired memory (RBMT) and current intellectual functioning (WAIS-R) co...

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and National Adult Reading Test (NART). Both NSFM and SFM subjects showed impaired memory (RBMT) and current intellectual functioning (WAIS-R) compared to matched controls. Both schizophrenic subjects and their relatives had general working memory impairment, however, the schizophrenic subjects were more impaired on verbal memory tasks. In comparison, the relatives of the schizophrenic subjects were impaired in areas of both visual and verbal memory. The relatives of the schizophrenic sample were less impaired in memory and current intellectual functioning than their schizophrenic subjects but significantly impaired in comparison to their matched controls. There was no significant variation in estimated IQ (NART) between both NSFM and SFM subjects compared to their matched controls. The findings indicate similar neuropsychological deficit in both SFM and NSFM subjects, indicative of genetic transmission of neuropsychological deficit in memory and intellectual ability in families multiply affected with schizophrenia.

XIII.B. 11 NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL DIFFERENCES IN NON FAMILIAL SCHIZOPHRENIC SUBJECTS A N D THEIR FIRST DEGREE RELATIVES D.M. Mockler, R.M. Murray, S. Frangou, T. Sigmunsson and T. Sharma Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, London, U.K. Non familial schizophrenic (NFS) (n = 12) and non familial relatives (NFR) (n=22) family subjects were compared for neuropsychological differences using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (RBMT) and the National Adult Reading Test (NART). The two subject groups were compared to controls with no history of neurological or psychiatric disorder. There was no significant variation in current intellectual and memory functioning when comparing NFR subjects to matched controis. The NFS subjects showed impaired current intellectual (WAIS-R) and memory (RBMT) functioning compared to matched controls. The NFS subjects displayed general working memory impairment, however, the subjects were more generally impaired on visual memory tasks and less impaired using verbal memory. There was no significant variation in estimated IQ (NART) between both FS and NFS subjects compared to their matched controls. The findings indicate that non familial schizophrenic subjects have neuropsychological differences in memory and intellectual ability in comparison to non familial relatives. There was no evidence of intellectual and memory impairment in non familial relatives compared to matched controls.

XIII.B. 12 A COMPARISON OF MEMORY AND INTELLECTUAL DECLINE IN SCHIZOPHRENIA A N D HEALTHY CONTROLS *D.M. Mockler, **J.M. R i o r d a n a n d *T. S h a r m a

*Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, London, U.K., **Department of Psychology, Claybury Hospital, London, U.K. The prevalence and course of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia has remains a point of debate. Is cognitive impairment in schizophrenia a dementing process, markedly declining with age or does cognitive impairment occur in the early stages of development, possibly pre/post onset of schizophrenia, with no further marked decline with advancing age? The study investigates memory and intellectual decline in schizophrenic (n= 83) subjects compared to healthy (n =47) controls' using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test and the National Adult Reading Test (NART) in a cross-sectional study using five age cohorts (18-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59 and 60-69 years of age). No significant variation in memory and current intellectual functioning (WAIS-R; Full Scale and Verbal IQ) was found across the five cohorts for the schizophrenic subjects. However, memory functioning in the control subjects was significantly disparate with impaired performance with increasing age. This was found to be related to age effects. The schizophrenic subjects showed impaired intellectual and memory functioning compared to the control cohorts. Memory functioning was not significantly variable when comparing the 60-69 year old schizophrenic/control cohorts. The findings indicate that intellectual functioning in both schizophrenics and controls does not decline significantly with years of illness or age. Also memory functioning does not decline significantly with age in schizophrenia. The healthy subjects memory functioning becomes comparable to schizophrenic subjects between the age of 60-69 years. It is possible that impaired memory functioning in schizophrenia reaches a base level in the early years/or pre illness and does not deteriorate significantly beyond this level with increasing age and years of illness.

XIII.B. 13 PLANNING AND VISUOSPATIAL WORKING MEMORY IN SCHIZOPHRENIA R.G. Morris, T. Rushe, P.W.R. W o o d r u f f a n d R.M. Murray

Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, U.K.